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Wildflowers, Trees, Grasses, Reptiles, Birds, Mammals in Arizona

AZ Mammals

  1. Bats of the Desert
  2. Bighorn Sheep
    -
    Last Rites of A Bighorn
    - Bighorn Squadron
    -Last Refuge - Bighorn
    -
    Bighorn Watching
  3. Ringtails Cat
  4. Bobcat
  5. California Sea Lion
  6. Coati, White-Nosed
  7. Collared Peccary
    (Javelina)
  8. Cottontail
  9. Common Dolphin
  10. Coyote
  11. Desert Dinosaurs
  12. Elk
  13. Finback Whale
  14. Gray Fox
  15. Gopher
  16. Jack Rabbits
  17. Kangaroo Rats
  18. Mexican Gray Wolf
  19. Mountain Lion
  20. Mule Deer
  21. North American Porcupine
  22. Prairie Dogs (video)
  23. The Pronghorn
  24. White-Tailed Deer
  25. Wild Burros
  26. Wolves
    - Mexican Gray Wolf
    - Return of El Lobo

AZ Birds

  1. Barn Owl
  2. Black-chinned hummingbird
  3. Black-Necked Stilt
  4. Desert Pupfish
  5. Great horned owls
  6. Golden Eagle
  7. Gambel’s Quail

    Hawks
  8. -Ferruginous hawk
  9. - Marsh Hawk
  10. - Northern Harriers
  11. - Sharp-shinned
  12. - Red-Tailed Hawk
  13. Pheasant ring-necked
  14. Ravens
  15. Roadrunner
  16. Turkeys
  17. Turkey Vulture
  18. Bird Watching at the Salton Sea

AZ Reptiles

  1. Black-Collared Lizard
  2. Bullfrog
  3. Chuckwallas
  4. Common King Snake
  5. Desert Dinosaurs
  6. Desert Iguana
  7. Desert Tortoise
    -
    Finding Cecil
    -
    Joshua Tree Tortoise Rescue
  8. Gila Monster
  9. Gopher Snakes
  10. Horned Lizards
  1. Rattlesnakes
    - Rattlesnakes
    - The Sidewinder
    -
    Spring Rattles In
    - Western Diamondback
  1. Striped whipsnakes
  2. Western Banded Gecko
  3. Western Coral Snake
  4. Woodhouse's Toad
  5. Reptiles of Anza-Borrego

AZ Insects

  1. Black Widow Spiders
  2. Cicadas
  3. Dragonflies
  4. Fire Ant
  5. Praying Mantis
  6. Scorpions
  7. Sphinx Moth
  8. Stinkbugs
  9. Tarantulas (video)
  10. Tarantula Hawks
  11. Western Tiger Swallowtail
  12. Western admiral
  13. Viceroy Butterfly
  14. Velvet ants
  15. Discover the World of Insects
  16. The Desert is Bugged: Bug Lighting
  17. Killer Bees"

AZ Wildflowers

  1. Apache Plume
  2. Arizona Poppy
  3. Blue Phacelia
  4. Big sagebrush
  5. Brittlebush
  6. Chia
  7. Chuparosa
  8. Cliffrose
  9. Cave primrose
  10. Datura (POISONOUS)
  11. Desert Chicory
  12. Desert Dandelion
  13. Desert Five-Spot
  14. Desert Globemallow
  15. Desert Lily
  16. Desert Lupine
  17. Desert Mariposa Lily
  18. Desert Marigold
  19. Desert Paintbrush
  20. Desert Pincushion
  21. Desert Sunflower
  22. Dogbane(POISONOUS)
  23. Devil’s Claw
  24. Dune Evening Primrose
  25. Fairy Duster
  26. Filaree Storksbill
  27. Ghost Flower
  28. Mojave Aster
  29. Popcorn Flower
  30. Prickly Poppies
  31. Sand Verbena
  32. Showy Four o'clock
  33. Spanish Needles
  34. Western Wallflower
  35. Woolly Daisy
  36. Yellow beeplant

AZ Cactus

  1. Barrel Cactus
  2. Beavertail Cactus
  3. Chain Fruit Cholla
  4. Cholla Cactus
  5. Claret cup cactus
  6. Desert Christmas Cactus
  7. Datil yucca
  8. Fishhook Cactus
  9. Hedgehog
  10. Joshua Tree
  11. Mojave Yucca
  12. Night-Blooming Cereus
  13. Organ Pipe Cactus
  14. Century Plant
  15. Prickly Pear Cactus
  16. Saguaro Cactus
  17. Soaptree Yucca

AZ Trees, shrubs and grasses

  1. bastard toadflax
  2. Crucifixion Thorn
  3. California Fan Palm
  4. Cocklebur
  5. Cottonwood
  6. Creosote Bush
  7. Desert Willow
  8. Elephant Tree
  9. Greasewood
  10. Joshua Tree
  11. Mormon Tea
  12. Ocotillo
  13. Mesquites
  14. Palo Verde Tree
  15. Poison ivy
  16. Four-wing saltbush
  17. Showy Milkweed
  18. Smoke Tree
  19. Stinging Nettles
  20. Tumbleweed
  21. Winterfat
Agave

Throughout the region are found a large number of species of agave (Agave desertii, A. utahensis and others), a second classic example of a prehistoric food plants. These include the century plant, so known for the odd mythology that the plant only blooms once every hundred years, which is fortunately untrue. The life history of the plant is, in fact, rather brief. Actually, it only takes some 12 to 15 years before it reaches maturity. As they grow, they emerge into small rounded heads or "cabbages." Over the years they enlarge, throwing out fibrous leaves tipped with an armor-like spike. Then in a remarkable burst, a central stalk shoots to the sky growing with great rapidity. In the largest species, the stalk may grow to be 20 to 30 feet tall and 18 inches in diameter at the base. From the top of the stalk clusters a bevy of bright yellow blossoms, thousands in number—the century plant’s swan song, for it then dies.
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Map of Arizona.jpg (55174 bytes)

Map of Arizona

 

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Map of the reservations and Four Corners 

 

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